An Unlikely Subject

An Unlikely Subject

On days where it is difficult to get out an about on a photography shoot (like today!) I often look about the house for interesting articles to capture (mostly thinking about macro photos).

One thing which I have never thought to capture in a photo was the very equipment that I use in photography and always have with me, my collection of lenses.  Perfect for macro photography as they are precisely and perfectly manufactured so that they are pretty much free from blemishes.

I have a selection of different lenses as mentioned in my previous post about my thought processes before, during and after a shoot which lend themselves well for creating different effects with the reflected light.

The lenses in this collection are;

  1. Canon 14mm L lens
  2. Tamron 70-300mm Macro
  3. Samyang 8mm Fisheye

I tried to recreate the studio feel for this collection to compliment to surgical precision that is involved in the manufacture of camera lenses in general.  I didn’t use a lot of fancy equipment, but instead the following;

  • 1 mounted lamp
  • 1 open box of A3 photo paper stood behind the lens to reflect the light and create a pure white background.
  • A tripod
  • Canon 60mm Macro lens
  • Canon remote shutter release

I did not use a flash (camera or external) as the lamp (positioned close enough) created enough light to capture the images, plus using a tripod I could reduce the camera shutter speed without fear of camera shake as I was using the remote release.
It is also important to use a light source from a specific point as this creates the great colours in the reflection of the lens.  I took the below shots indoors on a grey snowy day and so the shots are entirely possible in any house with a lamp that you can adjust (up and down) to intensify or reduce the light as required.

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I deliberately left the below images background slightly tinted as I think it compliments the colours in the lens…

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To brighten the background (if needed) in Photoshop during post processing I selected the background area using the magic wand selection tool, copied and pasted it into a new blank layer and then adjusted the curves to brighten.  The reason I did this in a new layer is that if any areas were selected and brightened that I did not really want, then I could create a layer mask on the enhanced layer and remove blemishes with the paint brush.  I could then merge the layers when happy with the result.

Finally, I took the below shot just before finishing the shoot as I finished by beer!!

Cheers!!! ;)

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Written by Barry Chignell

I believe that advice should be free, with this in mind FPR contains over 500 photography articles covering all aspects of the photography world, from Wedding Photography to HDR and interviews from online retailers to professional photographers. I am always interested to hear from anyone in the profession regarding new and exciting ideas and ventures and am happy to help photographers publicise their work. If you would like to discuss your photography and how FPR can help, email me at bchignell@gmail.com.